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Vocabulary Word

Word: imprudent

Definition: lacking caution; not prudent; injudicious


Sentences Containing 'imprudent'

I am afraid he has been very imprudent, and has deserved to lose Mr. Darcy's regard.''
Do not involve yourself or endeavor to involve him in an affection which the want of fortune would make so very imprudent.
Last Christmas you were afraid of his marrying me, because it would be imprudent; and now, because he is trying to get a girl with only ten thousand pounds, you want to find out that he is mercenary.''
added Elizabeth;``safe from a connection imprudent as to fortune.''
Imprudent as the marriage between Mr. Wickham and our poor Lydia would be, we are now anxious to be assured it has taken place, for there is but too much reason to fear they are not gone to Scotland.
My father and mother knew nothing of that; they only felt how imprudent a match it must be.
Whether success rendered us imprudent, or whether we were betrayed, I know not; but one evening, about fiveo'clock, our little cabin boy came breathlessly, to inform us that he had seen a detachment of custom house officers advancing in our direction.
Now, I am perhaps going to make an imprudent and thoughtless request, but''``Say on.''
``I was saying to him only yesterday,`You are imprudent, Monsieur Count; for when you go to Auteuil and take your servants the house is left unprotected.'
``How imprudent,''said Chateau Renaud,``to come on horseback to fight a duel with pistols, after all the instructions I had given him.''
The design was generous; but the execution was imprudent, and the nature and causes of the distress which it meant to relieve, were not, perhaps, well understood.
The success of this operation, therefore, without increasing in the smallest degree the capital of the country, would only have transferred a great part of it from prudent and profitable to imprudent and unprofitable undertakings.
The very bad policy of one country may thus render it, in some measure, dangerous and imprudent to establish what would otherwise be the best policy in another.
From being at first, perhaps, rather imprudent than criminal, he at last too often becomes one of the hardiest and most determined violators of the laws of society.
Why should imprudent unlearned souls trouble that which is both learned, and prudent?
For that a God should be an imprudent God, is a thing hard even to conceive: and why should they resolve to do me hurt?
The passion for philosophy, like that for religion, seems liable to this inconvenience, that, though it aims at the correction of our manners, and extirpation of our vices, it may only serve, by imprudent management, to foster a predominant inclination, and push the mind, with more determined resolution, towards that side which already _draws_ too much, by the bias and propensity of the natural temper.
Thus, for instance, the limitations and restraints of civil government, and a legal constitution, may be defended, either from _reason_, which reflecting on the great frailty and corruption of human nature, teaches, that no man can safely be trusted with unlimited authority; or from _experience_ and history, which inform us of the enormous abuses, that ambition, in every age and country, has been found to make of so imprudent a confidence.
Oh what a worthy man he is, Mister Copperfield, but how imprudent he has been!'
'So, Mr. Wickfield,' said I, at last, 'who is worth five hundred of you--or me'; for my life, I think, I could not have helped dividing that part of the sentence with an awkward jerk; 'has been imprudent, has he, Mr. Heep?'
'Oh, very imprudent indeed, Master Copperfield,' returned Uriah, sighing modestly.
had launched into imprudent and ill-judged speculations, and may not have had the money, for which he was morally and legally responsible, in hand; going on with pretended borrowings of money at enormous interest, really coming from--HEEP--and by--HEEP--fraudulently obtained or withheld from Mr. W.

More Vocab Words

::: injurious - harmful; causing injury
::: dirge - funeral song; slow mournful piece of music (sung over a dead person)
::: incriminate - accuse of or implicate in a crime; serve as evidence against; cause to seem or make guilty of a crime; Ex. incriminating evidence
::: contempt - scorn; disdain; ADJ. contemptuous; CF. contemptible
::: dispense - distribute; prepare and give out (medicines); N. dispensation: dispensing; religious system; official exemption from an obligation or a rule
::: antiquity - quality of being very old; ancient times;
::: bound - leap or spring; limit or confine; constitute the limit of; Ex. bounded by Canada; N: leap or jumping; boundary; ADJ: certain; having a duty to do something (legally or morally); confined by bonds; Ex. We are bound to be late; Ex. I am bound to say my opinion; CF. bounce, rebound
::: caldron - (cauldron) large kettle
::: stipend - pay for services
::: factotum - handyman; person who does all kinds of work; CF. do everything